Europeana releases 20 million records into public domain using CC0

Europeana — Europe’e digital library — has released 20 million records into the public domain using the CC0 Public Domain Dedication, says Glyn Moody in an identi.ca post.

And  “This is how to do it,”  he says.

It is indeed. Now it’s your turn, Big Music.

The release is the  “largest one-time dedication of cultural data to the public domain using CC0,” says  the Creative Commons blog, going on.

“The Europeana dataset consists of descriptive information from a huge trove of digitized cultural and artistic works.

“Now, per the Europeana Terms of Use, ‘all metadata (textual information on digitised cultural heritage) on the site are published without any restrictions on re-use.’ The public domain data can be useful for cultural institutions, researchers, and application developers. By removing all copyright restrictions from the data, Europeana helps to promote innovation and economic activity.

From the press release:

Importantly, the change represents a valuable contribution to the European Commission’s agenda to drive growth through digital innovation. Online open data is a core resource which can fuel enterprise and create opportunities for millions of Europeans working in Europe’s cultural and creative industries. The sector represents 3.3% of EU GDP and is worth over €150 billion in exports.

Europeana’s announcement was praised by Neelie Kroes, Vice-President of the European Commission, who said:

Open data is such a powerful idea, and Europeana is such a cultural asset, that only good things can result from the marriage of the two. People often speak about closing the digital divide and opening up culture to new audiences but very few can claim such a big contribution to those efforts as Europeana’s shift to creative commons.

The Creative Commons Affiliate teams in the Netherlands and Luxembourg, through partner organizations Institute for Information Law (IViR), Kennisland, and the Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg provided expert support to Europeana during this process. Europeana has been at the forefront of exploring ways to share the European cultural record. They are one of the first adopters of CC’s Public Domain Mark and continue to support a vibrant, healthy public domain.

[Follow me on Twitter @jonnewton8, and/ or identi.ca]