9/11 — connecting the dots

“The events of September 11, 2001, clearly demonstrated the need for law
enforcement agencies at the local, state, and federal levels to increase their capacity to
share information with one another. The 9/11 Commission asserted that the World Trade
Center attacks occurred, in part because law enforcement was unable to connect the dots, which may have provided the opportunity to disrupt the terrorists’ mission. However,
upon reflection and further investigation it seems probable that prior to the attacks there
simply was not enough information (dots) to raise concern or suspicion about that fateful
day.

“One can argue that the need for accurate information shared in a timely manner is
the lifeblood of any agency responsible for defending the home front. This dynamic is
further enhanced when municipal law enforcement agencies exist within a large urban
area such as Los Angeles County (CA), which is a target rich environment.
Using a quantitative analysis this thesis examines information and intelligence
sharing networks, data collection methodologies, common technical platforms (voice and
data), and financial considerations toward increasing information sharing among
independent police departments and suggests methods to improve information sharing
capabilities.”

That’s how Pasadena police chief Phillip L. Sanchez opens his Naval postgraduate school thesis,  adding:

“However, upon reflection and further investigation it seems probable that prior to the attacks there simply was not enough information (dots) to raise concern or suspicion about that fateful day.”

After an analysis of his subject matter Sanchez concludes:

“The research in this thesis argues that there are possibilities and options to improve information and intelligence sharing among America’s local law enforcement agencies. As a collective group, America’s police chiefs have the capacity, authority, and leadership potential to achieve this goal.

“The challenges associated with improving information and intelligence sharing among America’s law enforcement agencies will only be overcome if the collective leadership moves forward incrementally toward the ultimate goal of sharing information and intelligence effectively to protect the homeland.

However, the information gaps currently existing among the independent police departments and the LA JRIC are well defined.” [our italics]

But it isn’t only LA County. At all levels of policing, the United States is arguably no more ready for another strike like 9/11. Conversely, the perceived need to police within its frontiers has led America to become enfolded in bureaucracy, political  and corporate corruption and general malaise.

The US has, in the last decade or so, assumed the role of guardian of democracy  and the defender and upholder of Christian rights. But stepping out to do that means you become a target yourself and now the US is embroiled in a morass created by religious fundamentalism of all kinds. For example, the murders in Libya sparked by a supposedly anti-Muslim video.

Sanchez makes a number of interesting points but unfortunately, they’re to no avail.

America is a ticking bomb and another attack like 9/11 is inevitable; the only questions are: when, where and who will claim credit?

[Follow me on Twitter @jonnewton8, and/ or identi.ca]

(Cheers, sPDrAnOn)